Pavel Steidl

“Here was a guitarist who knew how to laugh with the music and share the joke with his audience. But behind the entertainer lies a serious artist, whose extended composition in memory of Jana Obrovska proved fully capable of stirring emotions at the other end of the scale. Never was a standing ovation more richly deserved. Pavel Steidl had won the hearts and minds of a capacity crowd.”
(Classical guitar magazine)

 Pavel Steidl was born in Rakovnik (Czech Republic). Since he won the first prize at the Radio France International Competition in Paris in 1982, he has become one of the most widely celebrated soloists of his generation. Between the members of the jury there were names of artist such as Alexander Tansman, Antonio Lauro, Maria Luisa Anido…

In 1987 he decided to emigrate to the Netherlands, where after years of studying and getting inspiration from many different artist he created his own style which also involves the authentic way of interpretation of 19th-century guitar literature on periodic instruments and even using some world music elements.

He also often plays in different chamber music ensembles collaborating with artists such as Carlo Domeniconi, Edin Karamazov and as a member of the European Guitar Quartet he can play together with great musicians, namely Zoran Dukic, Thomas Fellow and Reentko Dirks.

Pavel Steidl is also active as a composer and his own compositions are often played at his concerts. He played in more than 50 countries of the world, including Canada, the USA, China, India, Japan, Europe, South and Central America and many others.

Upon the request of the Italian Guitar Magazine Guitart the readers decided to choose him as guitar player of the year in 2004.

Pavel Steidl is a professor of classical guitar at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague and the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague.

He plays many instruments, but mainly a Francisco Simplicio (1926) and the romantic guitar: copy of a J.G.Stauffer guitar made by B.Kresse and an original instrument from the beginning of the 19th century by Nikolaus G.Ries from cca. 1830.